create now provides arts mentoring programs

What E-Waste Recyclers Won't Say

Share This Story    

When you"re making the decision to toss your PC, MAC, Blackberry, or iPhone do you know what actually happens to them? When the life of an electronic ends it becomes electronic waste, also known as e-waste. E-waste recyclers collect end of life electronics. Why? To trade. E-waste recyclers collect electronics for the purposes of trading intact electronics or trade commodities like copper, aluminum, plastics, circuit boards and more, after the electronic has been dismantled. Incidentally, e-waste recyclers are informal commodity traders.

Mechanical vs. Manual De-Manufacturing

What e-waste recyclers won"t say is that is there is an occupational hazard plus an economic and environmental impact to recycling. A majority of e-waste recyclers mechanically de-manufacturer e-waste in the US. Mechanical de-manufacturing is using machines, like a knife, hammermill, and/or chain shredder to break down the electronics. If the electronic is mechanically dismantled, the commodities end up co-mingled -- contaminated -- at that point it"s called residue or fluff. Recyclers don"t say there is no value in residue but the fact is no one will buy residue. Electronic residue must then be manually separated into commodities to have best online casino value. Manual de-manufacturing can also be done at the onset, by manually taking the electronic apart and separating the parts directly into commodities. Once separated into commodities an electronic item can be reincarnated to post-consumer raw material. Using shredders suffices the needs of their client"s destruction requirement and instructions, and demonstrates to the recycler"s clients that the electronic assets they have entrusted the recycler with is destroyed. Unfortunately, often times the recycler"s client (consumers or a business), does not discern the environmental impact of mechanical de-manufacturing of electronics. They only know their requirement.

Creating Value From Trash

What recyclers don"t say is that if the residue is not separated properly, what they have is something with no value...in other words, trash. Separating and processing electronic trash to a level that it becomes raw material has a financial impact and many benefits. Producing raw materials from recycled electronics creates jobs and is sustainable. Mechanical dismantling means trading the mixed components and exporting that to developing countries to sort, thereby making our trash someone else"s problem. Exporting intact electronics, E waste new picon the other hand is causing the developing countries on the receiving end to be resourceful in finding ways to get value from the components and parts. Developing countries then take on finding a solution to the trash problem. Perhaps not a solution the western world would agree with, but a solution.

Closing The Loop

For example, an intact computer tower manually dismantled captures aluminum from the frame, copper from the power supply, wires and hard drive, precious metals like gold and silver on a motherboard (also known as a circuit board) and ABS plastics from the panels. These commodities, if not mixed together and separated properly, all have value. Mechanical dismantling of a CRT captures the same aluminum, plastic, copper, and precious metals but it is contaminated residue that cannot even be given away for free as it is. Processing commodities adds value. All the metals like clean aluminum, clean copper, gold, and silver not mixed with anything else can be sold for raw material. ABS plastic scrap free of contaminates can be reincarnated into post consumer plastic pellets. All valuable. And a way to truly begin to close the loop on an endless cycle of trash circling the globe. You decide, which is more sustainable?



Other Ways You Can Get Involved

Send Story IdeasContact the EditorMake a Donation

Share This Story    

About the Author

(it) magazine partners with other organizations, its members and site visitors to provide stories that spotlight problems in society, the solutions to those problems, and the ways in which the public can help.
Our social media communities, site visitors and media partners help spread these replicable solutions across the country and around the world. (it) magazine is an initiative of the Community of Content Creators, an educational non profit (501c3) media group.





https://itmagazine.org/donate/

  • Join Us in the Media Room

    Get the popcorn ready! Soon you’ll be exposed to more exclusive, original and re-purposed video and still picture stories presented here especially for you to enhance your hero’s journey into making a difference.


  • Your Voice Heard Here!

    Get The Word Out!

    More Polls, Surveys, And Voting Coming Soon!
    Get The Word Out! Tell A Friend About Us!

  • We can’t help everyone, but everyone can help someone.


    Ronald Reagon
    President of the United States

  • Take Action Now

    You can find dozens of ways to get involved on the Global Poverty Project website, but here are a few highlights to get you started:
      Check Out More Action Steps

    • Partner Thanks!

      Partner-Thanks-Antioch-University

      Special Thanks to Professor Helen Hill.


    • Worth a Thousand Words

      River Boy
      A world-weary yet curious young boy plays along the Tonle Sap riverfront. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Early Morning At The Dump
      Families living on the garbage dump site awaken early to pick through the trash for recyclables. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Off To Work
      Workers in the Steung Meanchey municipal garbage dump, including scores of young children, face many hazards in order to survive. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Another Load Arrives
      Workers continue into the night, wearing headlamps and dodging an endless stream of dump trucks. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Steung Meanchey Backpack
      Many children working in the municipal garbage dump at Steung Meanchey dream of spending their days in school but never get the chance. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Friday Nights
      Weekends bring relief to many, who celebrate a night off by circling the city on their mopeds and bikes and picnicking in the park. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Table for Five
      Five street children join us for a special treat — to eat a full meal indoors. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.

      Small Voices
      Every child has a story to tell. (c) Theresa Kennedy 2012, from the making of “Small Voices: The Stories of Cambodia’s Children” by Heather E. Connell.


    • Reader Poll

      How do you like the new site?

      [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

      Brought to you by: Be the Match


      • Share Your Skills

        If you’d like to become part of a community of like-minded individuals who share their resources, skills and abilities in the pursuit of a better world, join us!

        Feed YOUR passion and purpose. We’re hiring volunteer editors, writers, producers, marketers, media planners, coordinators, event planners, fundraisers, social media and SEO experts, and more.

      https://itmagazine.org/donate/

      • Share Your Skills

        If you’d like to become part of a community of like-minded individuals who share their resources, skills and abilities in the pursuit of a better world, join us!

        Feed YOUR passion and purpose. We’re hiring volunteer editors, writers, producers, marketers, media planners, coordinators, event planners, fundraisers, social media and SEO experts, and more.